The customer focus matches HarrisData's culture and promise throughout our 45 years as an independent software vendor. Until a customer realizes benefits from our software, we have done nothing.

This year HarrisData celebrates 45 years in the software business.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. I was reminded of this by an analyst’s take on yet another cloud earnings report: “However, when asked my advice, it comes back to the same things: get customers live as fast as possible, get those same customers referencable [sic] and talking in the public domain, make sure the end user experience and integrations continue at a fast pace.” http://diginomica.com/2017/01/23/sap-hits-top-range-q4-2016-ups-guidance-2020/ (Den Howlett

This was the view of an investor, but the money position lines up with customer preferences here. Customers want to get live as fast as possible, both to get over the extra effort of implementation and to benefit from the software investment. Getting a customer referenceable is the process of ensuring the customer receives the benefits promised in the sales cycle. A fast pace on end user experience (I assume this is easy to learn / use) and integrations allows the customer to extend the value of the investment as the business environment changes.

The customer focus matches HarrisData’s culture and promise throughout our 45 years as an independent software vendor. Until a customer realizes benefits from our software, we have done nothing.

What are those benefits about? That is another thing that hasn’t changed much over the years -- software has always been about automating mind numbing repetitive tasks. Of course today we can address more kinds of tasks than in the past, and have developed powerful ways of doing so, such as;

Internet mashups: make integration and connection easier and faster. When combined with modern APIs the need for expensive integration work is greatly reduced. ERP implementation used to take years, and integration work was a large portion of the time and cost of the implementation. Today’s connected world moves faster, so the ability to quickly and inexpensively connect is essential.

Internet of Things: allows devices to directly enter data into enterprise transaction systems. User experience is freed from data entry… it’s now search, bookmark, approve. In the past, data entry flow and keystroke count defined the user experience. Today’s “smart” devices collect most data directly, supplementing online websites where consumers directly create transaction records. This information is best moved from machine to machine, with a note to the user that it happened. The user no longer serves the software logic of data entry, but is free to search and respond to information as it becomes available.

Machine Learning: mind dulling repetitive decisions are now done by the system, users simply approve results. This is a developing area where many talk about predictive analytics in decision making, yet applying the techniques to system set up and implementation provides a tantalizing path to faster implementation and realization of benefits.

45 years later, we still do pretty much the same thing-- HarrisData strives to serve our customers well by creating and selling excellent quality, affordable software that delivers great value-- however with the advances in technology we’re just much better at it.

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